Kodak Medalist II

Owner's Notes

When it comes to medium format photography – using 120 and 616 film, as opposed to 35mm film – I’ve had hits and misses with my cameras. Many of my medium format camera that were once in my possession

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Includes (2)

  • two film spools
  • carrying case
VIEW ALL

Brand
Kodak
Model
Medalist II
Condition
New

Reviews (11)

Average 5.0 Stars

No complaints here, Donald was very helpful in getting things set up. Would certainly rent from again.

Super flexible with drop off and pick up. Would definitely rent from him again and recommend.

Manfrotto Monopod

November 2017

Flexible pickup, equipment exactly as expected, there was also a gorillapod (which came in handy). Thanks!

Professional, kind, and flexible about delivery and pickup. The connections on both the power cable and the FireWire cable were both finicky, but not a problem as long as you didn’t disturb them during transfer. Would definitely rent from Don again.

Don was flexible with meeting times and really nice! Solid lender :)

Don was great to rent from. Extremely flexible with my timing, extremely cooperative with my not one but TWO rental extensions, and just an all around easygoing guy to communicate with for rental needs.

The Sony DSR-11 was pretty terrific as well. It was a little on the dusty side at first, but I was able to clean the heads thanks to some great YouTube tutorials out there, and captured almost 80 hours of video going back to the early 2000's. If you get the horizontal lines or the tape gets stuck as the first few did for me, the process of cleaning it can be found via searching "clean Sony DSR-11 Deck" on Google, and getting a few easy to find electronics cleaning products. Also, remember that the maximum resolution for DV is 720x480, so don't expect any crystal clear cinematic masterpieces here. That's something I totally forgot until watching my pixelated high school self on screen.

!!! One major thing to note is that Adobe Premiere does not currently support DV Capture as it did in previous editions. Your options are either Final Cut X, iMovie, Quicktime Player (which was actually my personal favorite as it was easiest and had the best guaranteed quality with limited timecode errors), or getting ahold of an older machine / virtual machine with Final Cut 7 or any Adobe Premiere iteration pre-2015. !!!

Don was great to rent from. Extremely flexible with my timing, extremely cooperative with my not one but TWO rental extensions, and just an all around easygoing guy to communicate with for rental needs.

The Sony DSR-11 was pretty terrific as well. It was a little on the dusty side at first, but I was able to clean the heads thanks to some great YouTube tutorials out there, and captured almost 80 hours of video going back to the early 2000's. If you get the horizontal lines or the tape gets stuck as the first few did for me, the process of cleaning it can be found via searching "clean Sony DSR-11 Deck" on Google, and getting a few easy to find electronics cleaning products. Also, remember that the maximum resolution for DV is 720x480, so don't expect any crystal clear cinematic masterpieces here. That's something I totally forgot until watching my pixelated high school self on screen.

!!! One major thing to note is that Adobe Premiere does not currently support DV Capture as it did in previous editions. Your options are either Final Cut X, iMovie, Quicktime Player (which was actually my personal favorite as it was easiest and had the best guaranteed quality with limited timecode errors), or getting ahold of an older machine / virtual machine with Final Cut 7 or any Adobe Premiere iteration pre-2015. !!!

Don was great to rent from. Extremely flexible with my timing, extremely cooperative with my not one but TWO rental extensions, and just an all around easygoing guy to communicate with for rental needs.

The Sony DSR-11 was pretty terrific as well. It was a little on the dusty side at first, but I was able to clean the heads thanks to some great YouTube tutorials out there, and captured almost 80 hours of video going back to the early 2000's. If you get the horizontal lines or the tape gets stuck as the first few did for me, the process of cleaning it can be found via searching "clean Sony DSR-11 Deck" on Google, and getting a few easy to find electronics cleaning products. Also, remember that the maximum resolution for DV is 720x480, so don't expect any crystal clear cinematic masterpieces here. That's something I totally forgot until watching my pixelated high school self on screen.

!!! One major thing to note is that Adobe Premiere does not currently support DV Capture as it did in previous editions. Your options are either Final Cut X, iMovie, Quicktime Player (which was actually my personal favorite as it was easiest and had the best guaranteed quality with limited timecode errors), or getting ahold of an older machine / virtual machine with Final Cut 7 or any Adobe Premiere iteration pre-2015. !!!

Don is super kind, accommodating and easy to work with. The camera he loaned me was in great condition and worked exactly as one would expect. No surprises. Thanks to Don for a great KS experience. I'd not only rent from him again but would highly recommend him to anyone else considering it.

Kodak Medalist II

August 2020

A great rental experience all around. 5 stars from me. Thanks!

Great experience, super communicative and helpful. Thanks again!

$20

per day

WEEK/WKND RATES

Equipment Replacement Value: $300


When it comes to medium format photography – using 120 and 616 film, as opposed to 35mm film – I’ve had hits and misses with my cameras. Many of my medium format camera that were once in my possession – the Holga, the Kowa Super 66, the Kodak Brownie Bull’s-Eye – have gone from “Chuck uses” to “Chuck doesn’t use” to “Chuck dropped it off at the Photo Center of Troy for their museum and never wants to see that camera ever again.”

That doesn’t mean that I’ve given up on medium format shooting. I still have my beloved Rolleiflex Automat MX and my dependable Agfa Clack. But I need a good, solid multifunction medium format camera, something that shows power and dedication and skill and determination.

Well, after much searching, I finally found the analogue camera for my needs. May I present to you the Kodak Medalist II.

The Kodak Medalist II was manufactured between 1946 and 1953, and is considered one of the company’s crown jewels. The Medalist II, an improvement over the original Medalist camera, can provide extremely tack-sharp photographs in a 6×9 format, a format similar to my Agfa Clack camera. But the Medalist II is a “rangefinder” camera; focusing involves staring into the viewfinder and adjusting the dials until two beam-split images in the viewfinder merge as one. Once the split images merge, the picture will be in perfect focus. Then you take the shot.

But as you can see from this picture on the left – which was taken five minutes after I removed the camera from its shipping box and cow-leather carrying case – this little Kodak has seen better days. I think it’s seen better lifetimes. The lens was clouded with gunk, the shutter was locked, the focusing mechanism required the strength of Hercules.

*You'll have to re-spool 120 film onto a 620 spool

Includes (2)

  • two film spools
  • carrying case
VIEW ALL

Brand
Kodak
Model
Medalist II
Condition
New